Egg donation and your safety

staying in the know blog

While you’re contemplating whether or not egg donation is for you, it’s important to consider some of the

potential risks around the process.  And yes, there are some – but what in life doesn’t have risks?

First things first – is egg donation safe? Yes, it is – especially when you’re in the right hands, which is why Nurture only works with the very best hospitals, clinics and fertility specialists around. Our donors’ safety and wellbeing is the most important thing to us!

But we’re all about playing open cards and making sure all of our donors are informed, so – take a deep breath, and let’s plunge right in.

The what: OHSS

The main risk is something called Ovarian Hyper-Stimulation Syndrome (or OHSS, which is a bit less of a mouthful!) Simply put: The fertility medication you’re put on stimulates your ovaries to produce more eggs. In rare cases, your ovary goes a little crazy and starts producing too many eggs, which can cause swelling of your ovaries, and a fluid build-up in other parts of your body. If it’s going to happen, OHSS usually kicks in a day or two after retrieval and symptoms include bloating, nausea and pain.

How we mitigate it:

All those scans you’re going to? Part of what the doctors are keeping an eye on is how your ovaries are reacting. If they see your body’s a little over-eager, they’ll lower the dose of your medication. Plus, in the vast majority of egg donation cycles in South Africa, your drug protocol will include an injection called Lupron, which effectively eliminates the development of OHSS. (Hooray!)

In the very unlikely event that you do get OHSS, the doctor will most likely send you off to bed and tell you to rest and drink loads of fluids until your ovaries shrink back to their less angry state. If they’re very concerned, they might book you into the clinic and put you on a drip and some antibiotics until you’re on the mend.

The what: Ovarian torsion

It even sounds painful – but thankfully it’s super, SUPER rare. Basically, ovarian torsion is when your ovary gets itself twisted with the tissues that support it. It can happen to any woman, but is more likely to occur in women who are pregnant or have undergone fertility treatment. The main symptom is intense pain. If you experience any severe pain during your cycle and in the days after your retrieval, phone up the clinic immediately. Surgery might be required, and the longer you leave it, the more you are at risk to possibly lose the ovary. Don’t be a hero – get in touch with the doctor as soon as you can!

How we mitigate it:

Take it easy after your retrieval – your kickboxing class can wait for a week! Ovarian torsion after a donation mostly occurs during vigorous exercise, so give it a week or so until you start climbing mountains again.

The what: Infection

With any medical procedure – from egg donation to dentistry – there is a risk of infection. A very, very small risk – but it’s still there.

How we mitigate it:

As we said earlier, our doctors and clinics are top-notch – there are no dodgy back-rooms on our books! Besides, what most clinics will do is give you a shot of antibiotics while you’re under to minimise your risk of infection. If you experience some bleeding after your procedure (a little is very normal), then make sure that you use a sanitary towel and not a tampon to further reduce the risk of infection.

The chances of anything going wrong during your donation are so very, very small (seriously, you’re more likely to get into a car crash on your way home), but here at Nurture, we firmly believe in informed consent.

Remember, if at any stage during or after your donation you feel anything unusual – any pain or discomfort – let your doctor or someone from the Nurture team know right away! And if at any stage anything is worrying you, feel free to give us a shout.